Descriptive Paragraph Writing

I guess in studying for the GED, I realized that I want to be a better writer. I mean, it helped me in my job, and in looking for a new job, and even in writing letters to my kids. One way to become a better writer is to write this blog. Like Mr. Williams said, write a little every day. I’m going to try that, and try to give you some help with writing, too. Let me know what writing questions you have in the comments section.

One thing Mr. Williams talked about is descriptive writing, so I thought I’d try that. Here’s the exercise: look out your window or sit on your front porch, and write a paragraph describing it, using words that talk about what you see, hear, smell, and feel.

Here’s my paragraph:

My front porch has a white fence around it. Sitting in the little enclosure, on a cushioned white chair, I can smell the jasmine flowers blooming in front of the porch. They’re little white stars on a green background, and I planted them myself twenty years ago and watched them grow. The soft wind feels nice on my face, and it caries the flower smell and the smell of cut grass to me. I can hear the sound of traffic in the distance and little rustling sounds of the leaves. Then, a big flock of noisy birds flies in, chatter, chatter, chatter! They land on my tree and drive me indoors.

Did you notice what words describe smells, sounds, sights, and feels of things?

Try writing your own paragraph, and post it in the comments section!

GED Writing: Run-ons and more Writing Prompts

Lauren posted this:

hi here is my sentence

I am a good cook. I can cook lots of things like lasagna which can be hard to get right and I can make my own pesto sauce or also some desserts too. I learn how to cook from when I was a child. My mother had five children so she cooked a lot and thats where I learned it from. Lots of people tell me I am good at cooking now and that makes me happy. My mom would be proud.

That’s a great paragraph, Lauren. You brought up different kinds of things that you could cook, and talked about your mom, which could end up being two main ideas in an essay. You might think about a third thing if you ever wanted to turn this into an full essay, but it’s a great start!

I noticed you had a few run-on sentences, so I thought I might talk about that a little.

Run-ons are pretty hard to catch. When we talk, we say a lot of “ands” and “buts” without really pausing sometimes. Our brains don’t think like an essay, they just kinda run and run. Just like run-ons.

“I can cook lots of things like lasagna which can be hard to get right and I can make my own pesto sauce or also some desserts too.”

This sentence can be split up. They best thing to do to split it is to find the verbs and the conjunctions (joining words). I’ll mark the verbs in green and the conjunctions in red.

“I can cook lots of things like lasagna which can be hard to get right and I can make my own pesto sauce or also some desserts too.”

A good rule to follow is to have two verbs at the most in each sentence. Since there’s three verbs in this sentence, it can be cut down to two sentences by removing the and. I would also replace the “or” with “and” because “or” means that you can cook pesto sauce or desserts, not both.

“I can cook lots of things like lasagna which can be hard to get right. I can make my own pesto sauce and also some desserts too.” Continue reading